soak


soak
1 verb
1 (I, T) if you soak something or let it soak, you keep it covered with a liquid for a period of time, especially in order to make it softer or easier to clean: Soak the beans overnight. | leave sth to soak: Just leave the dishes to soak; I'll wash them later. | soak sth off/out (=remove it by soaking): Soak the label off the jar.
2 (intransitive always + adv/prep, transitive) to make something completely wet, or to become completely wet
(+ through/into etc): If the ink soaks through the paper, it'll stain the table underneath. | soak sth: The rain came suddenly and soaked all the washing.
3 (I) to spend a long time taking a bath
4 (T) informal to make someone pay too much money in prices or taxes: Soak the rich seems to be the policy of all socialist governments
soak sth up phrasal verb (T)
1 if something soaks up a liquid, it takes the liquid into itself: He used a towel to soak up the blood.
2 to learn something quickly and easily: That child just soaks up information.
3 soak up the sun to sit outside for a long time enjoying the sun
2 noun (C)
1 a long and enjoyable time spent in the bath: a good long soak after shopping all day
2 an act of soaking something: give sth a soak: Give the towels a good soak, they're very dirty.
3 an old soak BrE humorous someone who is often drunk

Longman dictionary of contemporary English. 2004.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • soak — vb Soak, saturate, drench, steep, impregnate, sop, waterlog can mean to permeate or be permeated with or as if with water. Soak suggests immersion in a liquid so that the substance absorbs the moisture and usually becomes thoroughly wetted,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • soak — [sōk] vt. [ME soken < OE socian < base of sucan: see SUCK] 1. to make thoroughly wet; drench or saturate [soaked to the skin by the rain] 2. to submerge or keep in a liquid, as for thorough wetting, softening, for hydrotherapy, etc. 3. a)… …   English World dictionary

  • Soak — Soak, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Soaked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Soaking}.] [OE. soken, AS. socian to sioak, steep, fr. s?can, s?gan, to suck. See {Suck}.] 1. To cause or suffer to lie in a fluid till the substance has imbibed what it can contain; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • soak — soak·age; soak·er; soak·ing·ly; pre·soak; soak; …   English syllables

  • soak — ► VERB 1) make or become thoroughly wet by immersion in liquid. 2) (of a liquid) penetrate or permeate completely. 3) (soak up) absorb (a liquid). 4) (soak up) expose oneself to (something beneficial or enjoyable). 5) (soak oneself in) i …   English terms dictionary

  • Soak — Soak, v. i. 1. To lie steeping in water or other liquid; to become sturated; as, let the cloth lie and soak. [1913 Webster] 2. To enter (into something) by pores or interstices; as, water soaks into the earth or other porous matter. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • soak — index imbue, immerse (plunge into), overload, permeate, pervade Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • soak — sōk n an often hot medicated solution with which a body part is soaked usu. long or repeatedly esp. to promote healing, relieve pain, or stimulate local circulation …   Medical dictionary

  • soak — (v.) O.E. socian (related to sucan to suck ), from P.Gmc. *sukon (Cf. W.Flem. soken), from PIE root *seue to take liquid (see SUP (Cf. sup) (2)). Slang meaning to overcharge first recorded 1895. Related: Soaked; soaking …   Etymology dictionary

  • soak — [v] drench, wet absorb, assimilate, bathe, damp, dip, drink, drown, dunk, flood, imbrue, immerge, immerse, impregnate, infiltrate, infuse, macerate, marinate, merge, moisten, penetrate, percolate, permeate, pour into, pour on, saturate, seethe,… …   New thesaurus

  • soak — soak1 S3 [səuk US souk] v [: Old English; Origin: socian] 1.) [I and T] if you soak something, or if you let it soak, you keep it covered with a liquid for a period of time, especially in order to make it softer or easier to clean ▪ Soak the… …   Dictionary of contemporary English